Working with hundreds of clients has given me unique insights into what makes top talent tick. Here it is in one word: confidence. Professionals who differentiate themselves as high-potential talent all share a sense of confidence that convinces employers that they’re capable of doing anything.

But, what if you don’t have that confidence? Does that mean you’re not top talent? No, of course not! All it means is that this is an area of your personality that you should work on before you hit the job search.

Getting confident with yourself is all about becoming surer of your abilities and talents. However, even the most confident people get butterflies when they’re about to head into an interview. Here are three ways that you can increase your confidence instantly:

1. Watch this video from a top social psychologist at Harvard Business School

Amy Cuddy has created a revolutionary body of research on confidence and how you can actually trick your brain into thinking that you’re more confident than you are. Here’s her key message: open your body up, stand tall, and strike a ‘victory’ pose to fire the neurons that control confidence. Then, you’ll actually feel and come across as more confident. This is called the ‘high power pose’, and it’s so important that you learn how to do it. To watch her TED talk, click here!

2. Practice the high power pose before interviews or networking events

Don’t let your learning go to waste! I recommend heading to the washroom before a big interview or networking event and practicing the high power pose in a stall. Stand tall, reach your arms up, plant your feet, and do some stretching for about two minutes. Then, head into your interview or networking event with the confidence you need to own it!

3. Keep your body language open, stand tall, and don’t hunch into yourself

Just striking the high power pose isn’t enough to get you through an entire interview or networking event. The key is to keep tabs on your body language throughout this time and ensure that you’re open, feet are planted and not crossed, you’re standing tall, and you’re not hunching in on yourself. We tend to want to be smaller when we’re afraid or anxious, which in turn does nothing for our nerves. Instead of closing yourself up, actively focus on opening up and demonstrating your confidence. You’ll look and feel much better!

What are some strategies you use to raise your confidence? Let me know in the comments section!